Coconut Milk Yogurt

yogurt step3.editI love browsing the grocery store to find foods I’ve never used before or to just see what new products are out and how company’s are advertising them. In fact, a friend recently joked that instead of meeting up to go shopping at a clothing store, it was more likely we’d meet up to browse the shelves of the grocery store. A few months ago I was in the yogurt section of a local market that I really like and they had yogurt made from coconut milk. But it wasn’t like the other types of coconut yogurt I’d seen — it didn’t have any added sugar or thickeners and its only ingredients were coconut milk and cultures. Oh, and it was $12.99 for an 8-ounce jar (so, $1.62/ounce). I’m sorry, what?

Now, while I love trying new foods and exploring the grocery aisles, I do have a food-related pet peeve and that is companies who make outrageously expensive products that are then touted as being better than the rest and as a result make people feel like it costs a fortune to eat healthfully because you have to use $12.99 coconut yogurt instead of [insert yogurt or milk you’re currently using with your cereal]. Rant over. That said, I’m sure that yogurt was delicious and coconut milk yogurt is a great alternative to dairy yogurt for people who can’t — or don’t want to — eat dairy.

Anyway, I thought that there had to be a way to make coconut yogurt at home that would taste amazing, not have sugar or thickeners added, and not cost a fortune. Turns out there is and it is easier than you would ever expect. Like, stirring-two-ingredients-together easy.

yogurt step1.edit
Coconut milk and a probiotic capsule is all you need!

I use Native Forest Organic Coconut Milk because they guarantee that their cans aren’t lined with BPA-containing plastic. As for the probiotic, I’ve tried this with a couple different types and they all worked. But, I’d say the VSL#3 variety works the best and results in the best flavor. Again, try it with whatever type you have available. The Native Forest runs $2.35 for a 13.5 ounce can and VSL#3 runs $0.88 per capsule (and some pharmacies will let you purchase a single capsule). So for 13.5 ounces of really delicious homemade coconut milk yogurt, you’re spending roughly $3.25 ($0.24 per ounce).

yogurt step2.edit

It’s worth mentioning that since this stuff is made with full-fat coconut milk, it’s really rich. So, I don’t use it in the same way that I would a cow’s milk yogurt. I use it more like I would sour cream or creme fraiche. I’ll spread it on peanut butter toast with fruit or drizzle it over French toast, pancakes, or crepes. It’s an accessory to a meal, not the main star.

 

yogurt step4.edit
The yogurt after 24 hours…starting to thicken!
yogurt step5.edit
After its thickened!


Without further ado, here’s the coconut yogurt recipe. Oh, one more thing — we also have a video tutorial up on our YouTube account if you’re more of a visual learner.

Coconut Milk Yogurt
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
12 2 tablespoons each 5 minutes
Passive Time
24-48 hours
Servings Prep Time
12 2 tablespoons each 5 minutes
Passive Time
24-48 hours
Coconut Milk Yogurt
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
12 2 tablespoons each 5 minutes
Passive Time
24-48 hours
Servings Prep Time
12 2 tablespoons each 5 minutes
Passive Time
24-48 hours
Ingredients
Servings: 2 tablespoons each
Instructions
  1. Shake the can of coconut milk very well to ensure that the contents aren’t separated.
  2. Pour the contents of the can into a glass jar with a lid.
  3. Open the probiotic capsule and pour the powdery contents into the coconut milk. Stir the powder in until fully incorporated.
  4. Place the lid onto the top of the jar, but leave it askew so air can reach the coconut milk.
  5. Place the jar in a room temperature place where it won’t be disturbed. The back corner of a kitchen counter is where I usually leave it. Wait 24 hours.
  6. Stir after 24 hours and taste your mixture. If it’s as sour as you want it and also thickening, place the lid on correctly and store in the fridge. If you’d like the yogurt a little more sour/thicker, let it go another 12 hours and check it again. You can let it go around 48 hours total, but this total time does depend somewhat on the type of probiotics you’re using.
  7. Place the lid on your jar of yogurt and refrigerate.
Recipe Notes

*Note: When you’re left with about 1/4 cup of yogurt, pour a new can of coconut milk in, stir it up, and let it sit on the counter for another 24-48 hours to culture your new batch. You don’t need to use another probiotic capsule for subsequent batches as long as you save some of your current batch of yogurt to use as your culture.

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17 Comments on Coconut Milk Yogurt

  1. Jamie
    August 24, 2016 at 1:48 am (11 months ago)

    If I have just the powdered bed not in a capsule. How much should I use?

    Reply
    • Jamie
      August 24, 2016 at 1:51 am (11 months ago)

      *but

      Reply
    • C & J Nutrition
      August 24, 2016 at 6:12 pm (11 months ago)

      Hi Jamie! We haven’t used the non-capsule kind before but would say that using the amount in one serving is probably a good place to start. Since one capsule is one serving, we’d guess that whatever amount the company puts on the package of the loose powdered versions as one serving would have similar effects on the coconut milk! Will you let us know how much you end up using and how it turns out?

      Reply
  2. jared
    September 13, 2016 at 2:07 am (11 months ago)

    This yogurt tastes soooo good! And after you make one batch you can add more coconut milk to make more.

    Reply
    • C & J Nutrition
      September 13, 2016 at 1:14 pm (11 months ago)

      Glad you’ve had good luck with the method. It’s so cool how simple it is….and ya, once you make one batch you don’t have to use any more probiotic capsules!

      Reply
  3. indie
    September 16, 2016 at 5:52 pm (10 months ago)

    I tried it but its been 48 hours but is not thick i used advance 40t acidophilus from solgar. What am i doing wrong

    Reply
    • C & J Nutrition
      September 16, 2016 at 7:11 pm (10 months ago)

      Hi! Sometimes it doesn’t thicken up until you put it in the fridge and some batches just don’t thicken. The type of probiotic can make a difference, as can the temperature/time of year. We’ve had the best results with VSL #3 probiotic and when we make batches from a previous batch (i.e. instead of using a new probiotic capsule we stir 1/4 cup of a previous batch of yogurt into the new jar of coconut milk) we get the thickest yogurt. We’d recommend trying to put it in the fridge and seeing if it thickens a bit and how the flavor is. If the flavor is good, you might try using 1/4 cup of that yogurt to make your next batch. If the flavor is off, you might try a different probiotic. Keep us posted…and good luck!

      Reply
  4. Sionnan
    October 6, 2016 at 7:22 pm (10 months ago)

    Thank you for this recipe/method. It’s the only coconut yoghurt that has been successful for me. Easier than making your own dairy milk yogurt.

    Reply
    • C & J Nutrition
      October 6, 2016 at 7:29 pm (10 months ago)

      Thanks for letting us know! We agree, it’s so nice that it’s such an easy process…so we can always have a jar in the fridge! 🙂

      Reply
  5. Aimee
    October 6, 2016 at 10:31 pm (10 months ago)

    Have you tried this method using a low fat coconut milk?

    Reply
    • C & J Nutrition
      October 10, 2016 at 12:24 pm (10 months ago)

      We haven’t! If you try it will you let us know how it turns out?

      Reply
  6. Kerri
    January 8, 2017 at 8:35 pm (7 months ago)

    How can this be used to make dairy free salad dressing or other sauces?

    Reply
    • C & J Nutrition
      January 9, 2017 at 2:46 pm (7 months ago)

      You can substitute this yogurt in ounce for ounce for dairy yogurt in most recipes. It’s great as a substitute for creamy dressings like Ranch, etc. When using it in sauces, it does thin out a bit once it’s heated, but definitely adds creaminess and body to sauces. We’d love to hear what sauces/dressing recipes you try it in! We also love using it in baking in place of dairy yogurt. We’ve tried it in scone recipes and it’s GREAT!

      Reply
  7. noorjahan mohani
    March 31, 2017 at 6:59 pm (4 months ago)

    you think this will work with the simple version of native forest coconut milk that doesn’t have guar gum? Also can i use whole milk from trader joes with active cultures as a starter?
    thanks

    Reply
    • C & J Nutrition
      March 31, 2017 at 8:21 pm (4 months ago)

      Hi! We use the plain Native Forest and it works great. As for using dairy products to make this — we haven’t tried it but someone on our YouTube channel told us they didn’t have great luck with it. The bacteria that eat the dairy sugar may not like to feed on the coconut sugar. Keep us posted?

      Reply
  8. Peggy
    June 20, 2017 at 2:43 am (1 month ago)

    I use “culinary” coconut milk that comes in “paper” box to avoid can liners. Generally it’s pretty thick! Should I cut it with water first?

    Reply
    • C&J Nutrition
      June 20, 2017 at 8:19 pm (1 month ago)

      Hi! Yum — the culinary coconut milk should be able to be used as-is as long as it’s not coconut cream. We’d try it as-is first and see how the yogurt turns out (it will probably be nice and thick and delicious). If the yogurt is thicker than you’d like it to be, you can stir in a little water or coconut water after it’s already cultured. Will you let us know how it turns out?

      Reply

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